Tag Archives: John 16:33

Set Back

9 Nov

Clock

It doesn’t take much. It’s the little things that get me out of whack. Like a one-hour time change. I’m still not adjusted after leaving DST last weekend. Why is it I can get my body clock back on track from being in a time zone half way around the world in a few days, but adjusting that same internal clock to a one-hour change takes weeks?

The same is true for me in life. The big things seem easier to handle. An adrenaline injection comes with them that sustains me in them.

But the little things sneak up, unnoticed, like a stealthy saboteur and sink my ship before I know what happened. Little things like not sleeping well, critical remarks (made by me or directed at me), heavy traffic, being late… you get the idea. You have your own list, I’m sure.

My humanness works against me so often! However, my humanness is also my greatest asset.

Without being bound by the limits of this world I wouldn’t need God. I could handle anything, and handle it well. But my human limitations constantly remind me that I am needy and unable to get a hold of my life.

Many passages come to mind that both comfort and instruct:

  • Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you. Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. 1 Pet 5:6-8
  • Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. Matt 11:28-29
  • Jesus speaking: “I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.” John 16:33

That’s my short list. What’s yours?

———-

READY FOR SUNDAY

My best defense is a powerful and intentional offense. Lately, especially on Sunday mornings, I wake up expecting annoyances, issues, and conflict. I anticipate these with curiosity and hope. For just like my humanness is an asset that drives me toward God, these little nasties are blessings with opportunity for glorifying God. There’s nothing like a leader who handles this kind of stuff with grace, refocusing the team toward praising God.

My offensive weapon is the Sword.

For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh but have divine power to destroy strongholds. We destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God, and take every thought captive to obey Christ… 2 Cor 10:4-5

Before serving our King, let’s sharpen our swords tonight, eager to see what He will accomplish through us tomorrow.

Before darkness overtakes you

20 Apr

SMILING_DalmatianMy dad brought him home for us. A wriggly white puppy speckled with black spots. And equipped with sharp puppy teeth and huge paws. My brothers, sister, and I named him Pepper– for the spots he wore and for the energy that wound him up like my brother’s Wizzer.

Cute five pounds grew into strong 40 pounds while I wasn’t looking. Pepper’s body grew into his feet, but his internal discipline didn’t. He shredded everything his puppy teeth and flexing jaw muscles could handle—our toys, the blow-up wading pool, and Dad’s snowmobile seat.

The last offense put him on the list for deportation as soon as another home could be found. While he served his sentence in the garage, he grew crazier and plotted an endless array of techniques to escape when the side door opened.

His favorite (and easiest) attempts were when a 60-pound girl with knobby knees and long blonde-ish hair brought him dinner. I stood outside the wooden door picking at the peeling paint to work up courage and bravery becoming a Marine before turning the rusty knob. Pepper outgunned me. On his back legs he seemed to tower over my slight frame. Confined all day, his puppy-energy-expenditure did not come close to the needed quota. And his teeth. Oh, they were sharp! No wonder I stood there without opening the door.

More than a few times, he lunged at the door when he saw a crack of light and wrenched it free from my shaking hand, dog food raining down around my sneakers as his dish went flying. I screamed, then bolted, too. The game was on for Pepper. I was his terrified, and very unwilling, playmate.

He nipped at my ankles, and my legs pumped faster. More than once he knocked me down and puppy-played with his teeth on my thin skin. Several times he treed me in our little orchard, and I hurled apples down on him. Another game to him (who knew little green balls came from heaven?), and frantic self-preservation for me.

———-

Right after entering Jerusalem to cries of “Hosanna!” from the crowds, Jesus predicted his death on the cross. His heart was troubled even as he encouraged the crowd: “You will have the light just a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, before darkness overtakes you.” (John 12:35)

The crowds still did not know Jesus was Messiah. You can almost hear Jesus pleading with them to understand while he is still among them – before evil came nipping at their heels even though his sacrifice would drive out the prince of this world. (John 12:31)

Again, with just his disciples this time, Jesus entreats them to believe he is the Son of God as he predicts one of them will betray him: “I am telling you now before it happens, so that when it does happen you will believe that I am He.” (John 13:19) Yet again, his spirit was troubled.

As he comforts his disciples and prays for them, the mood of John’s Gospel changes. Tension and fear are replaced by Jesus’ deep love for his friends. Three times he encourages them: “Do not let your hearts be troubled.” Instead we are to believe in him for gives divine peace and has overcome the world.

Jesus’ heart was troubled at what lay ahead beyond any crisis or despair we can imagine. (To begin to describe what he suffered would take several posts.) The urgency for his followers to believe who he is in John 12 and 13 melts into the love song of Chapters 14-17. Immediately following, Jesus is arrested, and everything he predicted unfolds – his arrest, crucifixion, and death; Judas’ betrayal, Peter’s denial, and the disciples’ abandonment; and his resurrection as he conquered the grave and the prince of this world!

He still has influence, this prince of darkness. Unless you are a hermit without access to the news reports this past week, you have watched the evidence that darkness still has a foothold in this world. The horror at the Boston Marathon is not the end of what evil will do in this world. There will be more – much more. But we do not have to be terrorized like a little girl with a snarling Dalmatian snapping at her heels. Jesus took on trouble so we could have peace.

And peace, wrapped in light, shows up brilliantly against the darkness.

———-

Ready for Sunday

What he suffered for me is reason enough to worship him. That he did it because he loves me makes me love him back.

But it’s still hard to remember this in a way that translates to a practical overcoming attitude. How to remember his peace when faced with evil? I think being prepared is key. One way to prepare is to nurture the relationship by worshiping him. Another is by memorizing his Word. Both cause me to think about the eternal (instead of the temporal) aspects of the situation.

A good verse to memorize: “You, dear children,are from God and have overcome them, because the one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world.” 1 John 4:4

Thank God the people of Boston can breathe a little easier tonight. Praise him that even in the midst of horrendous evil he is greater.

Reality Check

28 Jan

We prayed for one of our own.  For anointing, power, and fortitude.  Because he was ordained a few days before.

My call to ministry came with an onslaught of emotion – “Really?  God you want me?”  “There is NO way I can do this!”  “I know you are with me – You and me… we’re gonna change the world!”  “How can this be????”

From excitement to sheer terror in tenths of a second!  But gradually, an under-current of adventure and a thrill of rising to the challenge took over, and I was off.  Off to take on this thing called Ministry, called and empowered by the Ruler of the Universe.

Days later, Reality grabbed my feet and pulled me back to earth with arms clothed in petty misunderstanding.  And it wasn’t long before character assassination and my own sin tripped me up and threw me down the stairs into discouragement and frustration.

This week, as we prayed for our friend, my mind ping-ponged between my call to those of Mary and Paul (Saul).  Before Reality had a chance to strike at them, God called him out.

An angel told Mary that she would be the mother of Messiah.  She was afraid (Luke 1:29-30), confused (v34), willing (v38), excited (v39), humbled, enraptured with her God (vs46-56), introspective (Lk 2:19), and filled with wonder (v33).   As she and Joseph dedicated their firstborn son at the temple in Jerusalem, God added Simeon’s prophecy to all that was in her heart: “This Child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed.  And a sword will pierce your own soul, too.” (vs34-35)  Up front Mary knows this call she has received is both glorious and grim.

Paul, too, looked into his future and quickly saw the dual aspect of God’s call (Acts 9:1-19).  Struck blind and led to the home of the disciple Ananias, to whom God had spoken and arranged to restore his sight, Paul knew right away he would have the privilege of being used mightily by God and of suffering for Jesus’ name (v16).  In fact, his preaching, just days after God called him, at the same time astonished the Christians and caused the Jews to conspire to kill him (vs20-23).

Then my imagination pictured Jesus– the ultimate example.  The most important and history-changing Call in the universe could not be fulfilled without the most horrific Suffering of all time.

And so we prayed for our compatriot, knowing that God will never leave him (or us) (Mt 28:20; Heb 13:5); that his and our adversity proves we are co-heirs with Christ (Rom 8:17); and that, although we will have trouble, Jesus has overcome the world and all its sufferings (Jn 16:33).

God does not call us for warm fuzzy feelings of significance; the more intense the call, the more intense the hardship and suffering.  So why run into it?  Why push into hurt, abuse, slander, back-stabbing, threats, and even the possibility of physical violence?  Why trade away a life focused on my comfort and 40-hour work weeks?

Simply, to hear two words: “Well done.”

Tomorrow is Sunday (again).  We may walk into a glorious day full of praise for God and what He is doing among the people we serve.  There may be hurt and pain in every conversation and around every turn in the halls.  Or a confusing combination of the two.  Neither changes God’s call.

God, help me to serve, sure of your call and in the power of Your Spirit.  And please use me to inspire those I lead to do the same.  For Your glory.

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